The Washington Post : business
12h00 04  mars
How to handle working for an anti-masker in an anti-mask community? Um ... don’t.
By Karla Miller
You’ve been offered a great job opportunity at an organization where colleagues and clientele don’t wear masks. Is it worth the risk?
14h15 03  mars
DeJoy’s latest USPS restructuring plan could increase bureaucracy and slow delivery, experts warn
By Jacob Bogage
The Postal Service will further divide the agency’s operations and offer early retirements to thousands of workers.
11h37
Biden limits eligibility for stimulus payments under pressure from moderate Senate Democrats
By Erica Werner and Jeff Stein
The plan would phase out the 1,400 payments faster for higher-income individuals after moderate Senate Democrats pushed for more “targeted” spending. The change comes as the Senate prepares to move forward with an initial procedural vote on President Biden’s 1.9 trillion relief...
12h00 28  février
Co-working companies tap into customers facing work-from-home fatigue
By Gregory Scruggs
The remote-work industry suffered a significant blow during the pandemic. At least 226 co-working locations closed permanently in 2020, according to Upsuite, a co-work matching service. But the industry sees a market in workers exhausted by work-from-home life.
13h00 25  février
Office novels have evolved alongside workplace culture. What will the future look like?
By Stuart Miller
A growing genre was flourishing just as white-collar workers went into quarantine. Authors consider how " or if " Zoom will fit into fiction.
15h00 24  février
A ” chef farmer’ pivots to survive the pandemic and heartbreaking loss
By Jennifer Oldham
A Colorado restaurateur and his community relied on each other through last year’s tragic upheavals. What emerged was a gutsy reinvention " that’s not yet finished.
10h44 03  mars
How to get a small-business loan under the Biden administration’s new PPP rules
By Aaron Gregg
The Small Business Administration has started offering loans for its next round of PPP funding. Here’s what small-business owners should expect in the next round of funding.
17h13
Walmart to invest 350 billion in U.S. manufacturing
By Abha Bhattarai
The country’s largest retailer says the 10-year investment will help create 750,000 jobs.
15h43
Fewer Americans are earning less than 15 an hour, but Black and Hispanic women make up a bigger share of them
By Andrew Van Dam
Before the novel coronavirus sent millions of low earners into unemployment, more than one in four workers earned less than 15 an hour.
12h00
In Democrats’ progressive paradise, borrowing is free, spending pays for itself, and interest rates never rise
By Steven Pearlstein
With their plans for trillions in stimulus relief packages, and push for a 15-an-hour minimum wage, Democrats are dismissing concerns about the rising national debt and inflationary pressures.
10h59 02  mars
Top Nike executive resigns after report of her son using her credit card for sneaker resale business
By Hannah Denham
Ann Hebert stepped down Monday, just days after a Bloomberg report connected her to her 19-year-old son’s sneaker resale company, West Coast Streetwear.
10h52
President Biden’s SEC pick signals companies could face wave of new disclosure rules
By Tory Newmyer
During a Tuesday nomination hearing before the Senate Banking Committee, Gensler also said that if confirmed, he will probe issues raised by the GameStop trading frenzy and its fallout.
10h33
The IRS paid 3 billion in interest to taxpayers because it failed to get refunds out on time
By Michelle Singletary
Even before coronavirus-related delays, the IRS has been paying out increasing amounts of money to taxpayers in interest on delayed refunds.
07h20
New report says failures at OSHA under Trump could have put more workers at risk during pandemic
By Eli Rosenberg
The agency received more safety complaints during the pandemic than the same period in 2019 yet performed significantly fewer inspections.
06h31
The 14 million CEO: Drug distributor boosts executive’s pay despite historic opioid settlement
By Douglas MacMillan and Kevin Schaul
The substantial payout was only possible because AmerisourceBergen relied on a controversial accounting method: excluding legal settlement costs from its year-end CEO evaluation.
16h26
Some Dr. Seuss books with racist imagery will go out of print
By Taylor Telford
The famed children’s author, who has sold hundreds of millions of books across the globe, has been criticized for his racist depictions of people of color.
15h02
rdquo; It just sucks’: America’s jobless owe thousands of dollars in taxes on their unemploymen
By Heather Long
Many unemployed Americans are learning that their unemployment benefits are taxable as they file their 2020 returns.
14h40
Vernon E. Jordan Jr., lawyer and D.C. political power broker, dies at 85
By Matt Schudel
He was a civil rights worker, political kingmaker and confidant of President Bill Clinton.
10h33
The IRS paid 3 billion in interest to taxpayers because it failed to get refunds out on time
By Michelle Singletary
Even before coronavirus-related delays, the IRS has been paying out increasing amounts of money to taxpayers in interest on delayed refunds.
12h00 23  février
What do Apple and some well-off senior citizens have in common? Financial quirks are helping them get richer.
By Allan Sloan
For America’s most highly valued company and some wealthy individuals in their 70s and older, it’s like money is falling from the skies.
12h00 03  mars
In Democrats’ progressive paradise, borrowing is free, spending pays for itself, and interest rates never rise
By Steven Pearlstein
With their plans for trillions in stimulus relief packages, and push for a 15-an-hour minimum wage, Democrats are dismissing concerns about the rising national debt and inflationary pressures.
14h15 30  janvier
Parkway Cleaners fuels growth through innovation and custom work
By Thomas Heath
Jon Simon taps business and technical savvy to build a D.C. mainstay that has cleaned a first lady’s quilt and a flag from Ford’s Theatre.
07h10 02  juillet
The new corporate swag: Branded masks, sanitizer spray bottles and Zoom vanity light rings
By Jena McGregor
For businesses such as Lemonade, whose executives appeared in branded masks for their IPO, it’s a chance to demonstrate their socially conscious identity
08h04 09  avril
WeWork proposes post-coronavirus changes to shared-office layouts
By Jena McGregor
The plan calls for “buffer seating, sanitizer stations in common rooms and one-way hallway traffic patterns to avoid “bottlenecks”
14h21 02  avril
The companies that are pledging not to lay off workers amid the coronavirus unemployment crisis
By Jena McGregor
A record 6.6 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week. But some companies pledged to hold off on job cuts, and are offering workers a financial cushion.
15h40 14  février
Employers are adding high-tech solutions to solve a low-tech problem: Getting more sleep
By Jena McGregor
Some employers are shifting from simply talking about better sleep " or giving employees tools to track it " to helping them with what to do about it.
11h00 04  mars
Google’s approach to historically Black schools helps explain why there are few Black engineers in Big Tech
By Nitasha Tiku
Google for years has been celebrated for trying to fix Silicon Valley’s race gap. But while Google had a head start on building relationships with HBCUs, critics say its track record also exposes instances when Google undervalued and underinvested in Black engineering students.
11h59 03  mars
Elon Musk’s SpaceX Starship rocket lands successfully but then explodes
By Christian Davenport
Google is going further in its efforts to stop advertisers from following individual people around the web. But the changes are likely to cement the company’s power online even more.
17h06
Google doubles down on its plan to disrupt ads that target Web history
By Gerrit De Vynck
ldquo;Ha. No one asked me about it,” said Neil Druckmann, director and writer of The Last of Us Part II.
16h53
Here’s why Abby uses a golf club in ” The Last of Us Part II’
By Gene Park
TOWN SQUARE EscapeSpace portable sheds, which are priced from approximately 12,000 to 16,000, are 12 to 16 feet long. Unlike some tiny homes, they are delivered fully constructed either as a shell or customized with finished interiors, electrical, plumbing and solar power options.
10h30 04  mars
Need extra space for a home office or classroom? A shed may be an option.
By Michele Lerner
WHERE WE LIVE A mall redevelopment plan may bring a more walkable, vibrant community.
13h00 03  mars
In Alexandria, Landmark-Van Dorn looks to become more than ” Condo Canyon’
By Kathy Orton
REAL ESTATE MATTERS When you pay off your mortgage your lender no longer has the obligation to pay your real estate taxes and homeowners insurance premium. From the day you pay off your loan, you must take on the obligation to pay these bills yourself -- on time and in full.
11h00
Paying off your mortgage? The property taxes and homeowners insurance are now on you.
By Ilyce Glink and Samuel J. Tamkin
TOWN SQUARE The National Association of Realtors recommended that its members explain the pitfalls of love letters to their buyer clients and remind their seller clients that their decisions about any offers should be based on objective criteria such as the terms and price rather than on the...
10h30
Home buyer love letters could create legal liability, real estate group warns
By Michele Lerner
Five decades after the gold standard ended, history shows efforts to control money rarely last long.
10h07 10  février
Searching for Money’s New Standard
By John Authers | Bloomberg
The strategy has suffered a devastating drought for more than a decade, sending investors scrambling for answers.
08h45 12  janvier
What’s Behind Value Investing’s Long Losing Streak?
By Nir Kaissar | Bloomberg
The rise in the shares of Elon Musk’s company defies logic. That hasn’t stopped Wall Street analysts trying to rationalize it.
08h04 11  janvier
Who Needs Tesla Analysts When There’s Reddit?
By Chris Bryant | Bloomberg
The state’s oil regulator is a little too defensive about methane emissions.
07h27
Texas Vents at France, Fake News and the Woke
By Liam Denning | Bloomberg
More than a year after Covid-19 touched off the worst pandemic in more than a century, scientists have yet to determine its origins. The closest related viruses to SARS-CoV-2 were found in bats more than 1,000 miles from the central Chinese city of Wuhan, where the disease erupted in late 2019....
11h07 04  mars
Where Are We in Finding the Coronavirus’s Origin?
By Jason Gale | Bloomberg
Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon’s feud with her predecessor and former mentor, Alex Salmond is deepening, threatening to undermine her pro-independence Scottish National Party at a time when it desperately needs to keep momentum. She faced a grilling at a parliamentary inquiry on...
06h40
How Scottish Infighting Threatens Independence Drive: QuickTake
By Rodney Jefferson and Alastair Reed | Bloomberg
The concept that it often makes good business sense to delay paying suppliers, keeping cash free for other purposes, has been taken to new levels of complexity. A global industry has grown up of financial go-betweens who buy unpaid invoices at a discount. The firms give vendors cash sooner than if...
06h43 03  mars
Explaining Supply Chain Finance and Greensill’s Woes
By Lucca de Paoli | Bloomberg
The vast majority of federal and state elections in the U.S. are guided by plurality rule: Each voter selects one candidate, and the person with the most votes wins. Critics say this system, while simple to grasp, means voters can’t fully express their views on a multicandidate field.
06h30
A Different Way to Vote Gets a New York City Audition
By Stacie Sherman | Bloomberg