Pappy golden age
08h01 13  janvier
Number 2487: Kirby Unwanted
nbsp;No, no Jack Kirby is not unwanted, the story is Unwanted, and from Young Romance #10 (1949), drawn by Jack Kirby and inked by Joe Simon. Mona Carter, in the story, has just gotten out of prison. She promises the warden she’ll go straight, but stepping out of the joint and into freedom she...
08h01 11  janvier
Number 2486: Thinking of a stinker, the Thinker
The Flash was one of my favorite superheroes in 1960-1961...I was especially rocked when The Flash #123 came out in ’61, and the cover featured both the Barry Allen Flash, and the alternate world Flash, Jay Garrick. That issue introduced the concept of Earths One and Two to the DC...
08h01 06  janvier
Number 2485: The crime of W. Allan Wood
I have been a fan of Wallace Wood since I first saw his work in the 1950s. I read once he did not like the nickname Wally, so I have tried not to use it, although occasionally I have lapsed. Death’s Double Cross is the first time I have seen Wood sign his name as W. Allan Wood.The artwork is...
08h01 04  janvier
Number 2484: When Rosie drew some riveting comic art
The character, Rosie the Riveteer, was the symbol of females working in the defense industry during World War while men were in the armed forces. There was no symbolic muscle-flexing woman who represented the women who were drawing comic books during that time.In one issue of Planet Comics (#39,...
08h01 30  décembre
Number 2483: Tarzan bundolo
nbsp;Tarzan hops onto Argus, his giant eagle, for a flight to the city of Cathne. There he encounters some belligerent Bolgani, who are bent on making Tarzan bund. Yep, there are ape-words in this story. Bolgani is gorilla, bund is dead. The creatures, as well as Tarzan, are wont to holler out ...
08h01 28  décembre
Number 2482: The five weapons that shook the world
I raised a smile on my face, even on a stay-at-home pandemic day. (I am writing this in September, 2020.) Mrs Pappy and I watched the filmed Broadway musical Hamilton, and a few days later I found the above panel. That coincidence was enough reason to show the whole story. It is from a Boy...
08h01 23  décembre
Number 2481: Merry Christmas from Pappy and Pogo
Christmas Day is a couple of days from now, but everyone has been wishing everyone else good will and happiness, and so will I. Merry Christmas, everybody. The Pogo story I have chosen for today is really different for the Dell series of Pogo comic books that came out in the early ’50s. For...
08h01 21  décembre
Number 2480: The Flying Fool
In the postwar years Joe Simon and Jack Kirby were represented at Harvey Comics (Stuntman, Boy Explorers), but the Harvey titles by S and K were quickly gone because of a glut on the comic book market. Before going to Prize Comics and starting Young Romance, a big success, Kirby and Simon worked...
08h01 16  décembre
Number 2479: Give the Shadow a great big hand
How many old comic book plots go something like this: rich person gets a letter saying if he doesn’t come up with by midnight he will be killed. I am sure the plot wasn’t new when this Shadow story was published, but had probably been carried on from dime novels and pulp magazines, radio and B...
08h01 14  décembre
Number 2478: The last of Black Bull
I am presenting the last story of the Black Bull, secret identity of rich young man Dale Darcy, who appeared in Prize Comics Western issues #71-#85. Black Bull was created, with his first story in #71 and another in issue #77, by Dick Briefer, more in the cartoonish tradition of his Frankenstein...
08h01 09  décembre
Number 2477: Ditko times 4
In the late ’50s and early ’60s my friend Ron and I read (and often scoffed at) what we called the monster books from the pre-Marvel monster comics of Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, and Don Heck. We thought the big monsters of Jack Kirby were funny. We were kids. I am way past my snarky teen...
08h01 07  décembre
Number 2476: Hey Kids Eat your Wheaties and score a free Captain Marvel comic book
Wheaties (the Breakfast of Champions as the advertising tag-line has said for decades) had a giveaway of free comic books in 1946 . Along with Captain Marvel Adventures, they had Whiz Comics, both from Fawcett, and Flash Comics and Funny Stuff from DC. If I had been a youngster at the time I...
08h01 02  décembre
Number 2475: Invisible sexy Suzie
The cute and sexy Suzie is ditzy in that dumb blonde cliché used seemingly forever in comedy. Normally Suzie isn’t that dumb, but for various reasons in this story Suzie does not see that she can’t be seen. Out of This World is the lead story of Suzie Comics #49 (actual issue #1, 1945, having...
08h01 30  novembre
Number 2474: Al Williamson races for the moon
A story was told by Al Williamson of the time he went looking for work after the big comic book crash in the 1950s. He went to Harvey Comics, where they gave him some penciled pages to ink. The penciling was done by none other than Jack Kirby for Race to the Moon #3 (1958). At first Williamson did...
08h01 26  novembre
Number 2473: Thanksgiving Turkey Award: Stardust
It is the day of the American Thanksgiving, the holiday gathering, with food, on the last Thursday of November. Sorry, nothing to eat here. The annual turkey award is only for the silliest, or most stupid or awesomely oddball comic book story I have seen this year.I picked an example of what made...
08h01 25  novembre
Number 2472: The man with the magnetic personality
I imagine a 1940 Ace Publishing Company editorial conference on the creation of Super-Mystery Comics. Men smoking cigars, jackets off, wearing white shirts and suspenders to hold up their pants are kicking around ideas for superheroes. Someone says a magnetic guy. But what would be his origin?...
08h01 23  novembre
Number 2471: Little Men
Dick Rockwell was an artist who worked in comic books after World War II. I have seen his work in Charles Biro’s crime and Western comics. He apparently stopped at Atlas Marvel long enough to do some work, including this story, The Little Men. Biographies of Rockwell always mention that he was...
08h01 18  novembre
Number 2470: Little Lulu assaults the king
A few weeks ago I had three stories about witches for a Halloween posting. I originally intended to show a Witch Hazel story from Little Lulu also, but here it is, late.John Stanley wrote the story for Little Lulu and Her Special Friends #3, a Dell 100-page giant comic from 1955. In the series...
08h01 16  novembre
Number 2469: The caped liar
A common trope in 1940s superhero comics is a juvenile in costume teamed up with an adult, like Batman and Robin. The older costumed character gives orders to the younger. With Crash Kid it is the other way around. Rusty Adams dresses as Crash Kid and orders around an adult taxi driver named Pook....
08h01 11  novembre
Number 2468: Into the catacombs you dirty rat
A Lovely Night in Paris is far from lovely. It is a horror story where a woman gets kidnapped by some little red monsters and taken deep into the catacombs of Paris. It is a love story in the making, as a handsome gendarme follows her and her captors underground.Joe Gill wrote the story, and Tom...
08h01 09  novembre
Number 2467: Blackhawk, Dr Omega and the world as we know it is doomed
The Blackhawks are flying around, but do they have a destination in mind? We don’t know. While in the air they intercept a powerful signal and land on an island with only two inhabitants. Human inhabitants, that is, Dr Omega and Moth.Dr Omega dresses like Robin Hood. Moth is a beautiful woman,...
08h01 04  novembre
Number 2466: The pinball racket
Joe Simon and Jack Kirby are credited with the entire contents of Headline Comics #24. It had been a superhero comic, and then became a crime comic.In this story they tell of the pinball racket. The mob would force small businesses to put in machines that would draw money from customers, then the...
08h01 02  novembre
Number 2465: Vulcan: Out of the fire and into more fire
The comic book character Vulcan (presumably no relation to Mr Spock from Star Trek) is found in the Public Domain Superheroes website: A descendant of the Roman God of Fire who shares his name, Vulcan could control all forms of fire, flame, and heat. His powers also included flight, fire...
07h01 28  octobre
Number 2464: Joe Sinnott could draw horror
Joe Sinnott, comic artist, died this year at age 93. Despite his advanced age, it is still a bit jarring when I see the death notice for someone I admire, no matter how old. I admire Joe Sinnott’s art, and have enjoyed it for over 60 of Joe’s 93 years.For Halloween I’ve got four stories Sinnott did...
07h01 26  octobre
Number 2463: Three witches
Halloween is in a few days, so we start off Halloween week with three stories of witches. What could be more appropriate? First up is They Burned a Witch, from The Beyond #16 (1952). Grand Comics Database credits Dick Beck with pencils, but the inker is not known.Our second witchy tale is by...